Monthly Archives: December 2012

Escarole and Orzo Soup with Turkey Parmesan Meatballs Recipe at Epicurious.com

Escarole and Orzo Soup with Turkey Parmesan Meatballs

Bon Appétit | February 2003

If desired, grate a little extra Parmesan cheese for passing; a sprinkling over the soup will echo the flavor in the meatballs.

Yield: Makes 4 main-course servings

  • 1 large egg
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 1/4 cup plain dried breadcrumbs
  • 12 ounces lean ground turkey
  • 1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 8 cups (or more) low-salt chicken broth
  • 1 cup chopped peeled carrots
  • 3/4 cup orzo (rice-shaped pasta)
  • 4 cups coarsely chopped escarole (about 1/2 medium head)

Whisk egg and 2 tablespoons water in medium bowl to blend. Mix in breadcrumbs; let stand 5 minutes. Add turkey, Parmesan cheese, parsley, garlic, salt, and pepper; gently stir to blend. Using wet hands, shape turkey mixture into 1 1/4-inch-diameter meatballs. Place on baking sheet; cover and chill 30 minutes.

Bring 8 cups chicken broth to boil in large pot. Add carrots and orzo; reduce heat to medium and simmer uncovered 8 minutes. Add turkey meatballs and simmer 10 minutes. Stir in chopped escarole and simmer until turkey meatballs, orzo, and escarole are tender, about 5 minutes longer. Season soup to taste with salt and pepper. (Can be made 2 hours ahead. Rewarm over medium heat, thinning with more broth if desired.)

Ladle soup into bowls and serve.

Per serving: calories, 350; total fat, 14 g; saturated fat, 5 g; cholesterol, 132 mg

Nutritional analysis provided by Bon Appétit

via Escarole and Orzo Soup with Turkey Parmesan Meatballs Recipe at Epicurious.com.

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Butternut Soup with Apple and Cumin

Butternut Soup with Apple and Cumin

adapted fromEpicurious | December 2002

Yield: Makes 6 servings

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 medium onions, peeled and sliced (3 cups)
  • 3 pounds butternut squash, peeled and cut into 2-inch cubes (8 cups)
  • 3 tart apples, cut in chunks, skin on
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper + shake of cayenne
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 3 sprigs of fresh thyme
  • 3 cups chicken broth, vegetable broth, or a commercial broth or bouillon cubes
  • Croutons

In a 6-quart heavy-bottomed soup pot, heat the oil over medium heat and stir in the onions. Cover, reduce the heat, and braise for 15 minutes, checking that the onions don’t burn.

Add the squash and apples to the onions. Sprinkle with salt, pepper, cumin, and thyme; cover the pot. Braise for another 15 minutes, checking once in a while that the vegetables do not burn.

Add the broth, bring to a boil, cover, reduce the heat, and simmer for 30 minutes or until the squash is tender.

Purée the soup in a blender or food processor in batches or use an immersion blender. Reheat the soup; taste for salt, and add more cumin to taste. Serve boiling hot with croutons.

via Butternut Soup with Cumin Recipe at Epicurious.com.

Saganaki (Flaming Cheese Opa)

SAGANAKI (FLAMING CHEESE OPA)

  • 1 lb. soft Kasseri or Kofalotiri cheese
  • 3 tbsp. butter
  • 1/2 lemon (juice)
  • 2 tbsp. brandy

Cut cheese into slices 1/4 inch thick. Place on broiler pan and brush with melted butter. Broil on high 4 to 6 inches from heat until cheese bubbles. Remove from heat. Pour brandy over cheese and ignite immediately.

Sprinkle with lemon juice and serve with bread. Opa!

via Cooks.com – Recipe – Saganaki (Flaming Cheese Opa).

Chocolate Whiskey Cake – Recipes – The New York Times

INGREDIENTS

  • 12 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into 1-inch pieces, more for pan
  • 85 grams unsweetened cocoa powder (about 3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons)
  • 1 1/2 cups brewed strong coffee
  • 1/2 cup whiskey
  • 200 grams granulated sugar (about 1 cup)
  • 156 grams light brown sugar (about 1 cup)
  • 240 grams all-purpose flour (about 2 cups)
  • 8 grams baking soda (about 1 1/2 teaspoons)
  • 3 grams fine sea salt (about 3/4 teaspoon)
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 3 large eggs
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 cup mini semisweet chocolate chips
  • Powdered sugar, for serving (optional)

PREPARATION

1.

Heat oven to 325 degrees. Butter a 10-inch springform pan. Dust with 2 tablespoons cocoa powder.

2.

In a medium saucepan over low heat, warm coffee, whiskey, 12 tablespoons butter and remaining cocoa powder, whisking occasionally, until butter is melted. Whisk in sugars until dissolved. Remove from heat and cool completely.

3.

In a bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, salt, pepper and cloves. In another bowl, whisk together eggs and vanilla. Slowly whisk egg mixture into chocolate mixture. Add dry ingredients and whisk to combine. Fold in chocolate chips.

4.

Pour batter into prepared pan. Transfer to oven and bake until a toothpick inserted in the center emerges clean, 55 to 65 minutes. Let cool on a wire rack, then remove sides of pan. Dust with powdered sugar before serving, if you like.

YIELD 8 to 10 servings

via Chocolate Whiskey Cake – Recipes – The New York Times.

Bacon-Wrapped Maple Pork Loin Recipe at Epicurious.com

Bacon-Wrapped Maple Pork Loin

Gourmet | March 2006

Maple syrup brings out the subtle sweetness of the bacon. If you like, you can substitute molasses (not blackstrap).

Yield: Makes 6 to 8 servings

For brining pork

  • 8 cups water
  • 1/3 cup kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup (Grade B or amber)
  • 1/2 teaspoon crushed black peppercorns
  • 2 sprigs fresh sage
  • 1 large garlic clove, smashed
  • 1 Turkish or 1/2 California bay leaf
  • 1 (4- to 4 1/2-lb) boneless pork loin roast, trimmed
  • For roasting pork
  • 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh sage
  • 3 tablespoons maple syrup (Grade B or amber)
  • 16 bacon slices (about 1 lb)
  • 1 tablespoon cider vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon water
  • Special equipment: an instant-read thermometer

Brine pork:

Combine all brining ingredients except pork loin in a 3- to 4-quart saucepan and heat over high heat, stirring, until salt is dissolved. Pour brine into a deep 4- to 5-quart pot; cool to room temperature, uncovered, about 2 hours.

Add pork to brine, making sure it is completely covered by brine, and marinate, covered and chilled, 8 to 24 hours.

Roast pork:

Put oven rack in middle position and preheat oven to 350°F.

Pat pork dry (discard brine) and remove any strings, then transfer to a roasting pan. Stir together garlic, sage, and 1 tablespoon syrup in a small bowl and rub all over pork. Lay bacon slices crosswise over loin, overlapping slightly, and tuck ends of bacon underneath loin.

Roast pork until thermometer registers 140°F, about 1 1/4 hours. Stir together 1 tablespoon syrup and vinegar until combined. Brush vinegar mixture over bacon slices and continue to roast pork until thermometer registers 150°F, about 10 minutes more. Remove from oven and let stand in pan 15 minutes. Transfer roast to a cutting board with a lip, reserving juices in pan, and let roast stand, uncovered, while making sauce.

Skim fat from pan juices and discard, then transfer jus to a small saucepan and bring to a simmer. Stir together cornstarch and water and whisk into jus. Simmer, stirring, until slightly thickened, about 1 minute. Remove from heat and stir in remaining tablespoon syrup. Serve pork with sauce.

via Bacon-Wrapped Maple Pork Loin Recipe at Epicurious.com.

potato latkes, smitten kitchen

Potato Pancakes [Latkes]

My formula is roughly this: a one-pound russet or baking potato to one small onion, a large egg, quarter-cup of flour, teaspoon of salt and a hefty pinch of black pepper. How many you yield has to do with how big you make them; I aim for small ones (approximately three inches across) and get about a dozen per batch.

But, if you’re not a formula person, here is a more official-like recipe:

  • 1 large baking potato (1 pound), peeled
  • 1 small onion (4 ounces), peeled
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 large egg, lightly beaten
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • Peanut oil, for frying

In a food processor or on a box grater, coarsely shred the potato and onion. For longer strands, lay the potato sideways in the chute of your food processor. Transfer to a colander or wrap in a cheesecloth sling, and squeeze as dry as possible. Let stand for 2 minutes, then squeeze dry again.

In a large bowl, whisk the flour, egg, salt and pepper together. Stir in the potato onion mixture until all pieces are evenly coated.

In a medium skillet, heat 2 tablespoons of vegetable oil until shimmering. Drop packed teaspoons of the potato mixture into the skillet and flatten them with the back of a spoon. Cook the latkes over moderately high heat until the edges are golden, about 1 1/2 minutes; flip and cook until golden on the bottom, about 1 minute. Drain on paper towels. Repeat with the remaining potato mixture, adding more oil to the skillet as needed.

Do ahead: Latkes are a do-ahead-er’s dream. You can also keep latkes warm in the oven for an hour or more, if you’re waiting for stragglers to arrive. Cooked, they keep well in the fridge for a day or two, or in the freezer, well wrapped, for up to two weeks. Reheat them in a single layer on a cookie sheet in a 400 degree oven until they’re crisp again. Bonus: If you undercooked them a bit or didn’t get the browning on them you’d hoped for, you can compensate for this in the oven.

via potato pancakes, even better | smitten kitchen.